Things to remember before hiring a wedding vendor

Let’s get something straight: Every time you hire a Photographer, Caterer, Musicians, Videographer, Florist, Decorator, Hotel ballroom, Or order something from a dress shop, , you must get your agreement in writing.

Until you sign a contract and put down a deposit, you have no guarantees that vendors will hold the date of your wedding. Read everything in your contracts and receipts, and be sure to document every single wedding arrangement you make.

 

Check Flexibility

 

The term flexibility itself states it’s meaning in context with Vendors. You might never want your wedding to get washed away in a snowstorm. In such a situation you can ensure if the banquet, hall, or a ballroom will be available. The creditability of your vendor depends upon the amount of flexibility he shows and you can easily rely on him. Being flexible here means your request should be reasonable. And if the vendor disagrees, look elsewhere.

 

 

Details for Coming Function

 

Detailing of your wedding will finally lead you to smooth going schedule and functions.  (For example, you want lot of roses and lilies, but you don’t know the exact number of centerpieces and bouquets).  So, when you make a contract clearly mention that details will be confirmed in writing. Most importantly it’s good to be clear with your vision and ideas since beginning to ensure that your vendor is the best match.

For example, if you’re at a point where you’re ready to book a decorator, you should make sure that you and the decorator are on same page of expectation. And the idea should be clear, what is to be done and how it is to be executed. It’s important to communicate your expectations before agreeing to hire a vendor.”

 

 

Check while doing contract

 

On every contract, write:

  • Dates and times of all services (including the time the vendor should arrive)
  • Date of the wedding
  • Names of all parties involved in the agreement
  • The deposit and final payment amounts (plus the payment schedule)
  • Contingency plans and substitutions (if white lilies aren’t available, white roses will be used instead)
  • Detailed description of services
  • Some venues might also require insurance or license (Details should be discussed earlier)

Note: When dealing with vendors that are providing a service on the wedding day itself, make sure the contract includes the name and number of the person the vendor should call if anything goes wrong or gets delayed.

 

What you get as refund

 

Along with the basics, every contract should include a cancellation or refund policy on both the ends. It should be clearly mentioned what refunds will be received if u cancel and what penalty the vendor will pay if they cancel.

Future is really ascertain, With refund clause you should be able to get back a certain percentage of any deposits you made if the party is canceled by a certain date. But the closer it is to the actual wedding date, the less likely you are to get your money back. Vendors and other wedding professionals are simply protecting their own business.

Make sure you entirely understand the refund policy. Sometimes these clauses are really complex to read and understand thoroughly.

“READ IT SIGN IT”

 

Receipts for every vendor

 

When you order something, such as a dress, a necklace, invitations or favors, the contract can be as brief as a store receipt. It should still include:

  • Wedding date
  • Style (a number, a detailed description, or the full invitation text, for example)
  • Date item will be picked up
  • Price and payment schedule
  • Outline of what the price includes (such as alterations, accessories, delivery, and envelopes)

 

And remember, don’t sign the contract unless you’re cent percent comfortable with it, and both you and the vendor should sign and date two copies so you can each have one.

 

for more information contact on : Desert Pearl Entertainement

 

 

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